If You Are Going to Follow Someone…

Figure 1A: Imam Diya' ud-Din Khalid Al-Baghdadi, one of the great marja` people of recent memory.

Figure 1A: Imam Diya’ ud-Din Khalid Al-Baghdadi, one of the great marja` people of recent memory.

I had first encountered the texts of the grand Imam, Diya’ ud-Din Khalid Al-Baghdadi (1193-1242 AH (AD 1779-1826) some 11 years ago through my brothers at Maktabat ul-Haqiqah by recommendation. I was thoroughly impressed by the layout, the diligence of the writing style and also his concern for other Muslims. It is for this reason that I wanted to give a biography of this man, who was a real warrior and a late marja` in the Ottoman period.

He is Khalid ibn Ahmad ibn Hussain Ash-Shahrazuri Ash-Shafi`ii An-Naqshabandi Al-Mujaddidi Al-Qadiri As-Suhrawardi Al-Kibrawi Al-Shishti. Born in the year 1193 AH (AD 1779) in Qurrah Taagh, some five miles from the city of As-Sulaimaniyyah and he was raised there. He was raised there under the authority of his father and recited the Qur’an in the local madrasah with the recitation of Hafs from `Asim.

Figure 2A: The crypt of the Imam in Damascus in Syria.

Figure 2A: The crypt of the Imam in Damascus in Syria.

He studied the texts of Ar-Rafi`ii, the rhyming text of Az-Zinjani in grammar and morphology and some other texts on the topic. He memorised countless texts even though he had not reached adulthood. After fifteen years of age, he traveled on to obtain knowledge. He learned from different Imams such as `Abdul Karim Al-Barzanji, `Ali Al-Manla Muhammad Salih, Al-Manla Ibrahim Al-Byari, `Abdullah Al-Kharbani.

Al-Baghdadi would later head to Damascus and also learn from such stellar Imams such as Muhammad Al-Kazbari and his student Mustafa Al-Kurdi and also took on the Qadiri Way. It was at this time that he also began writing his texts on theology. These would later be collected together in books such as Al-Iman wal-Islam.

Figure 3A: The grave of Imam Al-Baghdadi

Figure 3A: The grave of Imam Al-Baghdadi

By the time he died in the year 1242 AH (AD 1826), he had left behind some twenty texts or more in different languages and had also taken part in wars against colonists, cults and used the pen against them as well. If I was to tell anyone to follow someone or to attach someone to the Naqshabandis, attach yourselves to this one.

Figure 4A: The grave marker of the Imam along with his vital details. If only there was anyone worth their salt in the Anglo sphere that was worth their salt as was this Imam.

Figure 4A: The grave marker of the Imam along with his vital details. If only there was anyone worth their salt in the Anglo sphere that was worth their salt as was this Imam.

This Naqshabandi fought colonialism, preached the faith, recited the Qur’an accurately, broke the back of prostitution in Turkey, wrote extensively, built schools, learned from numerous scholars, left behind dozens of students.

This Naqshabandi made rulings against making people into eunuchs,  was fluent in several languages and used the language of Islamic thought (ARABIC) as the primary resource when he wrote. You should follow this man if you want to attach yourself to someone.

This Naqshabandi was pivotal in understanding the growth of fractional banking – along with another marja`, Imam `Abdul Qadir Ibn Badran (d. 1346 AH) – and assessing its’ rapacious impact on society and the bleak future this represents for all countries that indulge in that madness.

I hope that people will follow this man rather than the filth that they have been following in this present age in the Anglosphere. If you are looking for a role model from the past, then look no further.

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4 responses to “If You Are Going to Follow Someone…

  1. Salaam Alaykum,

    I am really confused reading this.

    In a previous text I read.

    ”Notable Rulings

    The Imam ruled that all Sufi groups today are phoney and part of Satanic secret societies to undermine Islam and Muslim Orthodoxy.

    [Al-Mawahib ur-Rabbaniyyah: fil Ajwibati `an As’ilat il-Qazaniyyah, pp. 195-197]”

    and then I read this.

    ” Al-Qadiri As-Suhrawardi Al-Kibrawi Al-Shishti.”

    What should I make of this? Confusing to say at least.

    • As-Salaamu `Alaikum should be the address with the As- at the beginning of the expression. As for what comes next, there is nothing to make of it. Today’s Sufi groups, please read the text from the Imam again:

      ”Notable Rulings

      The Imam ruled that all Sufi groups today are phoney and part of Satanic secret societies to undermine Islam and Muslim Orthodoxy.

      [Al-Mawahib ur-Rabbaniyyah: fil Ajwibati `an As’ilat il-Qazaniyyah, pp. 195-197]”

      Please see all other posts together to accurately understand. The marja` people are not salafis (which are apostates in general) and sufis groups (some of which are also dangerous innovators or they are unbelievers and freemasons in general).

      This can be taken from Imams Muhammmad Sa`id Ramadan Al-Bouti, `Abdul Qadir Ibn Badran, `Abdul Ghani Al-Labadi, may Allah have mercy on all of them.

      was-Salaam,

      Al-Hajj Abu Ja`far Al-Hanbali

  2. As-Salaamu `Alaikum,

    I was aware that in the quote it stated ‘today’. However I was referring to the fact that there seems to be a legitimate claim of sufi order ‘ways’ (or, as per the quote, used to be at least).

    But to claim that it used to be legitimate and all of a sudden (in a span of less than 100 years) they ALL became phoney and part of Satanic secret societies seems a bit weird to me.

    To me it would not make sense that in a span of more or less 100 years all of a sudden the sufi orders all became phoney and part of Satanic secret societies.

    I tend to agree that obviously there is a lot of innovation within these groups, however if we agree that there used to be such a thing as legitimate sufi orders than the chances that some of them survived with their authentic teachings (i.e it may be that not all of them turned phoney ect.)

    Diya’ ud-Din Khalid Al-Baghdadi (1193-1242 AH)
    Imam Mustafa ad-Dumi- (1265-1322 AH)

    And what does it mean to take on a ‘Qaidir/Shishti/Kibrawi’ way? ”took on the Qadiri Way.” I am confused on this one, if one is An-Naqshabandi what does it mean that he’s also Qadiri?

    I’ve noticed a lot of scholars have ‘Qadiri’ or ‘Chisty’ added to their name but what does it really mean?

    If I were to strictly follow Chisty spiritual rules and their school of thought would that also make me Chisty? or do I have to have a Chisty shaykh to be able to call myself chisty.

    Was not my intention to stir any debate or anything, as I am young, I am genuinely confused. From what I understand one is advised to have a spiritual guide. And most spiritual guides claim a tariqa. Now I am not saying that all of them are per se not innovators, however reading that they all are ”phoney and part of Satanic secret societies.” Shocked me a bit.

    Please note that this is no way critique to the scholars!

    You can also send me an private answer on mail and you can delete the rest on here if you like!. I am sorry if my first answer was phrased wrongly.

    And please forgive my bad English as it’s not my native language. Thank you for your reply.

    • As salam alaikum,

      I wouldn’t get bogged down by being so particular. It looks to me a general statement that implies in today’s time most of the tariqas and claimants are fraud. This is no different to Sufi shaykhs 700 years ago saying similar that most of those claiming to be sufi shaykhs are not real sufi shaykhs and true ones are rare and so on. Such statements are used often by scholars and true inheritors of tasawuf and tariqas in todays time too. Its a general statement to be in caution against sufi claimants of the time and not implying tariqas or the path of tassawuf is dead and lost.

      It is important that we have foundation knowledge of the place of sufism, in the sense of what exactly tasawuf is and its branches, conditions for a person to be considered a shaykh or master in tasawwuf, or the categories of shaykhs within tasawuf and at what stage a person even enters into this path and so on. Sufi tariqas are not for everyone despite the attraction and instead for people who have passed the stage of being a “student of knowledge”, like a post degree graduation masters course. But you can benefit through books written by Sufis that are addressed to the general public and now being increasingly made available through translations. Note that by even being in company with a pious and erudite local scholar it is also a “tariqa” and you are through his company, guidance and advise getting yourself close to God just as the goal of any tariqas is. But except that tariqas are a higher advanced level requiring far more spiritual efforts, far more nuance in reflecting on the self and far more rigorous against matters that are doubtful or disliked, and at peak levels the knowledge being gained through it being far advanced requiring good grasp of basics to understand properly and so on.

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