The Residual Effect of Salafiyyah

Figure 1A: Imam Mohammed Ghanem (above), a real Imam of a local masjid, is forced to pick up the pieces from the mess Salafiyyah left.
Figure 1A: Imam Mohammed Ghanem (above), a real Imam of a local masjid, is forced to pick up the pieces from the mess Salafiyyah left.

This goes in line with what I have been saying for years about the John McEnroe form of Islam, but people insist on learning their own way. After Salafiyyah is removed from a people, one of the outcomes is a dislike for the symbols of the faith.

The reason is that these things have been forced and punishments have been implemented (even though there is no lashing or punishment listed in the Revealed Law for people who were not in the masjid or praying in public) for affairs that are not mandated with punishments and also upon those who are not responsible or even ignorant..

The “enjoining of the right and forbidding of the wrong” method Salafiyyah prides itself on produces robots and also thugs, so it is no strange thing that the people of Mosul (long known for producing hadith scholars, theologians, wandering preachers and great ascetics of history) can be pushed to the brink. Responses to Salafiyyah always produce hatred for the cult from people allowed to choose.

Remember the great theologian and hadith scholar Abu Ya`la Al-Mawsili. Such a wonderful city that made some great people that suffered such a difficult time.

I offer the following article below just for your perusal and reflection.

_______________________________________________

Imam Mohammed Ghanem was forbidden to conduct Friday prayers under Islamic State rule because he refused to pledge allegiance to the group

Imam Mohammed Ghanem was forbidden to conduct Friday prayers under Islamic State rule because he refused to pledge allegiance to the group

In recaptured areas of Mosul, the extreme interpretation of Islam that jihadists forced on the local population for more than two years has sparked a backlash against religious observance.

After the Islamic State group seized the city in June 2014, it made prayers compulsory for people who were outside their homes, banned smoking, mandated beards for men and veils for women, smashed artefacts it said were idolatrous, publicly executed homosexuals and cut off the hands of thieves.

The jihadists cast their efforts as enacting the true interpretation of Islam — an assertion that most Muslims reject — but for some people, rather than making them more religious as intended, IS extremism had the opposite effect.

Iraqi men pray outside a mosque in Mosul's al-Masarif neighbourhood

Iraqi men pray outside a mosque in Mosul’s al-Masarif neighbourhood

The call to prayer sounds over a mosque’s loudspeakers in a recaptured area of Mosul, but a butcher named Omar continues working — something that would have been impossible under IS rule.

“Mosul is an Islamic city and most young people used to pray,” but IS was “forcing us… we had to go to the mosque against our will”, he said.

Before eastern Mosul was retaken from IS during the massive operation to recapture the northern city that was launched on October 17, shops had to close five times a day for prayers.

“One day, the boy who works with me received 35 lashes because he hadn’t been praying,” Omar said.

“Now, we are no longer obliged to close our stores… Whether we pray or not, the decision is ours.”

Imam Mohammed Ghanem, who was forbidden to conduct Friday prayers under IS rule because he refused to pledge allegiance to the group, said the jihadists sparked a backlash against religion.

“Now some people hate the time of prayer because IS forced them” to pray, Ghanem said.

– ‘Too much pressure’ –

“They reject these rules because they associate them with IS, even if they are in fact true Islamic precepts,” he said.

“Put too much pressure on something and it will explode. This is what’s happening now with the people: they want to live the way they want,” he said.

A children's nursery in eastern Mosul with the faces of girls and animals painted over by Islamic State group fighters

A children’s nursery in eastern Mosul with the faces of girls and animals painted over by Islamic State group fighters

According to Ghanem, part of his work before IS seized Mosul was educating people about Islamic practices and correcting them if necessary.

“Now, we say nothing because they reject religious authority. If we tell them they are doing something wrong, they tell us that we are from IS,” he said.

In another area of eastern Mosul, where rain is accumulating in craters left by the fighting, Imam Fares Adel said he too has changed the way he interacts with the faithful.

“Now we are afraid to give advice to people because they feel uncomfortable with the religious clothing” worn by imams, said Adel.

The imam said he understands those residents who “reject Islam”, but thinks the situation will “gradually” return to normal.

“The number of people is gradually increasing and they will all come back once of the footprint of IS has disappeared,” said Adel.

In Ghanem’s mosque, latecomers have to pray outside.

Around 40 worshippers kneel near fruit and vegetable stands to pray, while hundreds are squeezed inside the mosque.

“The imam has a good mentality and he speaks well to us. More and more people are coming back” to the mosque, said 25-year-old resident Mohammed Ali.

Now, without the threat of IS reprisals, “they come because they choose to”.

 

 

`ABDUR-RAHMAN IBN AWF

Figure 1A: The tomb of the Companion, `Abdur-Rahman ibn `Awf, may Allah be pleased with him
Figure 1A: A spot dedicated to the memory of the Companion, `Abdur-Rahman ibn `Awf, may Allah be pleased with him

Imam Taqi ud-Din `Abdul Ghani ibn `Abdul Wahid Al-Maqdisi (d. 600 AH), may Allah be pleased with him, mentioned the following:

A Word about `Abdur-Rahman ibn `Awf  [1]

He is Abu Muhammad `Abdur-Rahman ibn `Awf ibn `Abdu `Awf ibn `Abdul Harith ibn Zahrah ibn Kilab. His lineage and that of the Messenger of Allah, peace and blessings of Allah be upon him, meet at the point of Kilab ibn Murrah.

His mother was named As-Saffa’ and another authority mentioned Al-`Unaqa’ bint `Awf ibn `Abdul Harith ibn Zahrah and she had made the Hijrah. `Abdur-Rahman ibn `Awf became a Muslim early on and witnessed the Battle of Badr.

He also witnessed the other battles with the Messenger of Allah, peace and blessings of Allah be upon him, and it is authentically narrated that the Messenger of Allah, peace and blessings of Allah be upon him, prayed behind him in the Battle of Tabuk at the time of Fajr.

His children were the following:

1) Salim Al-Akbar. He died before the revelation.

2) Umm ul-Qasim. She was born in the Age of Ignorance.

3) Muhammad. He was the child that `Abdur-Rahman ibn `Awf took his kunyah from and he was born after the revelation began.

4) Ibrahim, 5) Humaid and 6) Isma`il. Their mother had the name Umm Kulthum bint `Uqbah ibn Abu Mu`ait ibn Abi `Amr ibn Umayyah ibn `Abdu Shams ibn `Abdu Manaf. She was an emigrant and also one of those who gave the oath of allegiance.

All of the children from `Abdur-Rahman ibn `Awf mentioned above were born from this woman and they narrated hadith.

Other children include:

7) `Urwah ibn `Abdur-Rahman. He was killed in Afriqah and his mother’s name was Nuhairah bint Hani’ ibn Qaisah ibn Mas`ud ibn Sha`ban.

8) Salim Al-Asghar. He was killed in Afriqah. His mother’s name was Sahlah bint Suhail ibn `Amr and he was the brother of Muhammad ibn Abi Hudhaifah ibn `Utbah.

9) `Abdullah Al-Akbar. He was killed in Afriqah. His mother was from the Banu `Abdil-Ash-hal.

10) Abu Bakr ibn `Abdur-Rahman, 11) Abu Salamah, the Faqih and he is known as `Abdullah Al-Asghar. His mother’s name was Tamadir bint Al-Asbagh from the Kalbi tribe. She was the first one from the Kalbi tribe to have married someone from the Quraish.

12) `Abdur-Rahman ibn `Abdur-Rahman and 13) Mus`ab ibn `Abdur-Rahman. He was in the police force of Marwan ibn Al-Hakam in Al-Madinah. He died in Al-Madinah as well.

`Abdur-Rahman ibn `Awf died in Al-Madinah at 72 years old and was buried in Al-Baqi` graveyard in the year 32 AH in the khilafah of `Uthman ibn `Affan and it was the third khalifah that also prayed upon him.

 

[1] Mukhtasar Sirat ir-Rasul, pp. 205-227

The 14 Great Reciters and Preachers of the Qur’an

Figure 1A: The Greatest Recorded Reciter to have ever done it. Imam Mahmud Khalil Al-Husari taking some time out.
Figure 1A: The Greatest Recorded Reciter to have ever done it. Imam Mahmud Khalil Al-Husari taking some time out.

1. Nafi` al-Madani: Nafi` ibn `Abdur-Rahman ibn Abi Nu`aim (70-169 AH). One of the authentic scholars of knowledge and thought, a great reciter. Nafi` was originally from Isbahan (Isfahan) in Iran and became famous for his recitation. His most famous successors are the following:

a. Qalun: Abu Musa `Isa ibn Mina Az-Zarqi (120-220 AH), freed slave of the Banu Zahrah. Indeed he was the great Qari of Madinah and the chief grammarian of his time.

b. Warsh: `Uthman ibn Sa`id Al-Qibti Al-Masri (110-197 AH), the freed slave of someone from the Quraish and the chief head of the reciters with accuracy and righteousness among the Egyptians.

c. Al-Azraq: Abu Ya`qub Yusuf ibn `Amr ibn Yasar Al-Madani, but also later Al-Masri (d. 240 AH). Imam Al-Azraq was just, a great teacher, truthful and verifying as well as trustworthy.

d. Al-Asbahani: Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn `Abdur-Rahim Al-Asbahani (296 AH). One of the great Imams in the narration from Imam Warsh, he was trustworthy and upright.

 

2. Ibn Kathir Al-Makki: Abu Ma`bad `Abdullah al-`Attar Ad-Dari Al-Fasi (45-120 AH). A great north African by lineage, Imam of the scholars of recitation in Makkah and undisputed acholar of the Qur’an. His successors include:

a. Al-Bazzi: Abul Hasan Ahmad ibn Muhammad ibn `Abdullah (170-250 AH). Recitor and scholar of the Qur’an in Makkah and Imam in Masjid al-Haram, he was their head of recitation and mu’adh-dhin.

b. Qunbul: Abu `Amr Muhamamd ibn `Abdur-Rahman al-Makhzumi (165-291 AH).

 

3. Abu `Amr ibn Al-`Ala: Zabbad ibn Al-`Ala’ At-Tamimi Al-Mazini Al-Basri (d. 68-154 AH). He was head of Arabic and Recitation among the people of Al-Basrah. Successors include:

 a. Hafs Ad-Duri: Abu `Umar ibn `Umar ibn `Abdul `Aziz al-Azdi Al-Baghdadi (d. 246 AH). Scholar and head of the people in faith in his time in Baghdad.

 b. As-Susi: Abu Shu`aib Salih ibn Ziyad As-Susi (d. 261 AH). The Great Reciter and Head of Scholars in Recitation in his time.

 

4. Ibn `Amir Ad-Dimashqi: Abu `Imran `Abdullah Al-Yahsubi (80-118 AH). A great North African by lineage, Imam of the People of Sham in Recitation and Qur’an scholarship. Successors of his include:

a. Hisham ibn `Ammar: Abul Walid As-Sulami (153-245 AH). The head of the scholars of Damascus and their preacher in the Central Masjid.

b. Ibn Dhakwan: Abu `Amr `Abdullah ibn Ahmad Al-Fihri Ad-Dimashqi (173-242 AH). Imam and narrator of the transmission of Ibn `Amir.

 

5. `Asim ibn Abin-Najud Al-Kufi: Abu Bakr, freed slave of the Banu Asad. He is the Shaikh of the People of Recitation in Al-Kufah. He had numerous successors, the most outstanding being:

a. Shu`bah: Abu Bakr ibn `Ayyash Al-Asadi Al-Kufi (95-193 AH). He was one of the people of knowledge in his time and had a high rank.

b. Hafs ibn Sulaiman: Abu `Umar Al-Asadi Al-Kufi. (90-180 AH). He was the most knowledgeable of the students of `Asim in recitation and was well established in his recitation.

 

6. Hamzah ibn Habib Az-Ziyyat: Abu `Ammarah Al-Kufi At-Taymi (80-156 AH). Torchbearer, explainer of the Qur’an, Pious man and Worshipper of his time. Successors of the Imam include:

a. Khalaf ibn Hisham: Abu Muhamamd Al-Asadi Al-Baghdadi ( 150-229 AH)

b. Khallad: Abu `Isa ibn Khalid Ash-Shaibani Al-Kufi (d. 220 AH). An Imam in Recitation, Trustworthy, Knower of Allah and Attentive.

 

7. Al-Kasa’ii: Abul Hasan `Ali ibn Hamzah Al-Fasi (d. 119-189 AH). A North African by lineage, he was declared the chief recitor and preacher in Al-Kufah after Hamzah. The two main successors were:

a. Abul Harith: Al-Laith ibn Khalid Al-Baghdadi (d. 240 AH). Well respected, well known and attentive to detail.

b. Hafs Ad-Duri: This is the same one mentioned previously.

 

8. Abu Ja`far Yazid ibn Al-Qa`qa: Yazid ibn Al-Qa`qa` Al-Makhzumi al-Madani (d. 130 AH). A great Imam, follower of the Companions and a well known reciter.

a. `Isa ibn Wardan: Abul Harith Al-Madani (d. 160 AH). A great recitor and Imam in his time and one of the great narrators.

b. Ibn Jammaz: Abur-Rabi` Sulaiman ibn Salam ibn Jammaz Az-Zuhri (d. 171 AH). Recitor, Exacting in knowledge and Pure Hearted Teacher.

 

9. Ya`qub Al-Hadrami: Abu Muhammad Ya`qub ibn Ishaq ibn Zaid (117-205 AH). Imam of the People of Al-Basrah in recitation, reciter and knowledgeable scholar.

a. Ruwais: Abu `Abdullah Muhammad ibn al-Mutawakkil Al-Basri (d. 238 AH). Reciter, preacher, teacher and knower of the recitations among the people of Al-Basrah.

b. Rawh ibn `Abdul Mu’min: Abul Hasan al-Basri An-Nahwi Al-Hudhali (d. 234 AH). A great reciter of Al-Basrah in his time and a great scholar among the people.

 

10. Khalaf ibn Hisham Al-Bazzar: He was one of the successors of Hamzah ibn Habib. His successors include:

a. Ishaq Al-Warraq: Abu Ya`qub Al-Marwazi Al-Baghdadi (d. 286 AH). The rector of the reciters and their institutions in Baghdad.

b. Idris al-Haddad: Abul Hasan ibn `Abdul Karim Al-Baghdadi (189-292 AH). The reciter, the teacher, major reciter in Baghdad.

 

11. Ibn Mahis: Muhammad ibn `Abdur-Rahman As-Sahmi Al-Makki (d. 123 AH). The chief reciter of the People of Makkah with Ibn Kathir and one of the most knowledgeable of people in Arabic in the city of Makkah.

a. Al-Bizzi: One of the narrators from Ibn Kathir.

b. Ibn Shunbudh: Abul Hasan Muhammad ibn Ahmad ibn Ayyub Al-Baghdadi (d. 328 AH). One of the great teachers of Iraq and a major scholar.

 

12. Al-Yazidi: Abu Muhammad Yahya ibn Al-Mubarak Al-`Adawi (128-202 AH). He was a grammarian, reciter and a trustworthy narrator.

a. Sulaiman: Abu Ayyub ibn Al-Hakam Al-Khayyat Al-Baghdadi, the teacher in Al-Basri (d. 235 AH).

b. Ahmad ibn Farih: Abu Ja`far Ad-Darir Al-Baghdadi (d. 303 AH).

 

13. Al-Hasan Al-Basri: Abu Sa`id Al-Hasan ibn Yassar Al-Basri (d. 110 AH). Imam of his time and chief judge. His successors include:

a. Shuja` ibn Abi Nasr Al-Balkhi: Abu Nu`aim Shuja` Al-Baghdadi (d. 190 AH).

b. Ad-Dawri: one of the great narrators from Abu `Amr ibn Al-`

 

14. Al-A`mash: Abu Muhammad Sulaiman ibn Mahran Al-Kufi (d. 148 AH). He was one of the great recitors among the Imam. This Imam was succeeded by many, including:

a. Al-Hasan ibn Sa`id: Abul `Abbas Al-Basri (d. 371 AH). Imam of his time in Al-Basrah.

b. Abul Faraj Ash-Shunbudhi: Muhammad ibn Ahmad ibn Ibrahim Al-Baghdadi (d. 377 AH). One of the greatest reciters of the Qur’an from Baghdad.

 

Taken from Imam Mujir ud-Din Al-`Ulaimi’s Fath ur-Rahman fi Tafsir il-Qur’an, vol.1, pp. 3-7

Talhah ibn `Ubaidullah

Figure 1A: The resting place of the Companion, Talhah ibn `Ubaidullah, may Allah be pleased with him. It has since been reduced to rubble by Salafis.
Figure 1A: The resting place of the Companion, Talhah ibn `Ubaidullah, may Allah be pleased with him. It has since been reduced to rubble by Salafis.

Imam Taqi ud-Din `Abdul Ghani ibn Abdul Wahid Al-Maqdisi (d. 600 AH) mentioned the following:

A Word Regarding Talhah ibn `Ubaidullah[1]

He is Abu Muhammad Talhah ibn `Ubaidullah ibn `Uthman ibn `Amr ibn Ka`b ibn Sa`d ibn Taym ibn Murrah ibn Ka`b ibn Lu’ay ibn Ghalib.

His lineage meets that of the Messenger of Allah, peace and blessings of Allah be upon him at the point of Murrah ibn Ka`b. His mother was As-Sa`bah bint Al-Hadrami, the sister of Al-`Ula’ ibn Al-Hadrami.

The name of Al-Hadrami was `Abdullah ibn `Ubbad ibn Akbar ibn `Awf ibn Malik ibn `Uwaif ibn Khazraj ibn Iyyad ibn As-Sidq. The mother of Talhah became Muslim and died upon that faith.

Talhah was one of the early Muslims and witnessed the Battle of Uhud and every other thing thereafter. He did not witness the Battle of Badr as he was away in Sham on business and trade. He was still given a portion of the war treasure from the battle by the Messenger of Allah, peace and blessings of Allah be upon him.

He had the following children:

1) Muhammad As-Sajjad. He was killed with his father.

2) `Imran. The mother of him and Muhammad As-Sajjad was Hamnah bint Jahsh.

3) Musa ibn Talhah. His mother was Khawlah bint Al-Qa`qa` ibn Ma`bad ibn Zurarah.

4) Ya`qub, 5) Isma`il, and 6) Ishaq. The mother of these sons was Umm Abban bint `Utbh ibn Rabi`ah.

7) Zakariyyah, 8) `A’ishah. Their mother had the name Umm Kulthum bint Abi Bakr As-Siddiq, may Allah be pleased with all of them.

9) `Isa and 10) Yahya. The mother of these two is Su`da bint `Awf from the Murrah tribe.

11) Umm Ishaq bint Talhah. Her mother is Umm Al-Harith bint Qusamah bint Hanzalah from the Tayy tribe.

Talhah ibn `Ubaidullah was said to have had some 11 children and some authorities have included two more children: `Uthman and Salih. These two names have not been definitely documented.

Talhah ibn `Ubaidullah was killed in the year 36 AH during the confusion occurring on the Day of the Camel and he was 62 years of age at the time.

[1] Mukhtasar Sirat ir-Rasul, pp. 205-227